Category Archives: Ugg

Cold Feet? Here’s How to Stay Warm!

As the weather gets colder, icy cold feet can be a serious problem. We’ve got a few tricks and tips for you this season, so read on!

1. Stay Dry!

Waterproof Merrell Moab Boots with GORE-TEX
Merrell Moab Boots with GORE-TEX waterproof technology.

First, protect your feet from outside moisture. The best way to do this is to wear waterproof boots and shoes.  Look for something that is breathable, like GORE-TEX technology or boots with Waterproof treated leather uppers, like Sorel boots and Timberland boots.

Sorel Boots
Sorel Boots with waterproof suede/leather uppers and rubber bottoms to keep out moisture.

Breathability is important because feet that can’t breathe will sweat, producing moisture that will make your feet get cold! Your feet sweat even when they’re cold, so carry an extra pair of socks and swap them out.

Timberland Boots
Timberland 6 inch Premium boots with waterproof leather uppers and 400 grams of PrimaLoft ECO® insulation.

2. Know your materials.

When it comes to warmth, what makes up your sock or shoe lining is way more important than how thick it is.

A Cotton Johnston and Murphy Sock
A Cotton Johnston and Murphy Sock

Cotton = Cold ! Cotton easily gets wet, especially if your feet are sweating. And once cotton gets damp, it no longer keeps its warmth.  That means frozen toes! Cotton socks have their place, but being outside in cold, damp or wet conditions requires something else.

SmartWool Hiker Street Sock
SmartWool Unisex Hiker Street Sock is 69% Merino Wool, 30% Nylon, and 1% Elastane.

Wool = Warm !  Merino wool is our favorite material for cold-weather socks, because the wool fibers manage moisture and regulate temperature naturally. It’s also less itchy when compared to other wool materials. You’ll find Merino wool in our SmartWool and Darn Tough Socks.

Best-Selling Women's Darn Tough Pebbles Crew Light Cushion Sock
This best-selling women’s light cushion crew sock from Darn Tough is 46% Merino Wool, 51% Nylon, and 3% Lycra Spandex with seamless construction for the ultimate comfort.

3. Layer Up

Sometimes one sock isn’t enough to do the job. Instead of picking one heavy weight sock, it’s usually better to start with a lightweight, moisture-wicking sock (liner sock) and then add a wool sock on top.  If you’re heading out in seriously cold temperatures, your best bet is to use three layers–a lightweight moisture-wicking sock under a  lightweight wool sock, with a medium to heavy wool sock on top.

When layering, it’s important to make sure that your feet are still comfortable. If your shoes or socks are fitting too tightly, skip the extra layer.  Too much pressure on your foot will cut off circulation to your toes, which can be dangerous in some conditions and defeats the purpose of wearing multiple socks to keep your feet warm. You want enough space that you have a layer of warm air between your socks and your shoes–enough space to wiggle your toes easily in socks.

4.  Add some sole.

A wool or sheepskin insole will keep you warm in cool weather.  Most winter boots have a thick sole to prevent too much conduction on cold surfaces. The further away your feet are from the cold ground, the warmer they will be.  Look for antimicrobial technologies that keep your feet dry, comfortable, and odor-free!

Make sure to pull out liners and insoles when you take your boots off so that they dry properly!

5. Foot Warmers

You can always buy foot warmers to keep in your shoes, but there are a few other ways to warm up your feet at home.  You can make your own footwarmer out of fleece material filled with rice or flax seed.  Pop it into the microwave and then wrap it around your feet. You can also fill a water bottle with hot water and then roll it under your feet. Make sure you have socks on or that there is a layer over the water bottle to protect your feet. For more foot warming ideas, see our Pinterest Board: Cozy Toes.

Follow The Shoe Mart’s board Cozy Toes on Pinterest.

6. Slip into Warmth


Nothing is better for hanging around the house than a warm pair of slippers, and we’ve got them all! Check out slippers from Minnetonka Moccasin, Tempur-pedic, Sorel, Vionic, L.B. Evans, and Ugg.

Protecting Your Feet From the Cold

As the temperature outside drops, the risk of cold-related injury to your feet increases. Prolonged exposure to cold weather can result in frostbite or–in the case of very humid or damp conditions—trench foot or pernio.

You face a greater risk of frostbite and other cold-related injuries if you have poor circulation or nerve damage, have been consuming alcohol (increases body heat loss), or use products that contain nicotine.  Here are some tips to protect your feet from the cold:

1. Stay nourished and hydrated.  Dehydration, lack of nutrients, and low blood sugar can all have a negative effect on your body’s temperature regulation.

2. Stay warm. Layer your clothing.  Your base layer should be an insulating material that wicks away sweat and moisture, such as wool or synthetic material.  Wear socks in materials designed for cold weather, such as Smartwool and Darn Tough socks.  Longer socks offer more protection than ankle socks.

3. Stay dry. Remember that drier feet are warmer feet. Clothing should be waterproof if possible. Avoid Cotton because it retains moisture, choose synthetic or wool instead.  Carry an extra pair of socks in case your first pair gets wet from sweat or the elements. You can help prevent your feet from sweating with antiperspirant products, foot powders, and special insoles.

4. Pick the right shoe–in the right size! Waterproof shoes are preferable in wet, cold weather. Be sure that the shoes are a good fit, and that you try them on with the pair of socks you intend to wear with them. (For info on how to try on shoes properly, watch the video below.) Shoes that are too tight can interfere with blood flow. Shoes that are too loose will allow exposure to wind and cold.

5. Rotate your shoes.  Your feet need time to breathe in order to stay healthy—and so do your shoes.  Rotating between two or more winter shoes is ideal so that each pair has time to air out and dry, creating a better environment for your feet.

How to Clean Suede Shoes


Many people are intimidated when it comes to cleaning suede shoes. However, with a few tricks and tools, you’ll find the process is rather easy.

You’ll Need:

1. A suede brush

2. A suede eraser

3. Rag and sponge

4. White paper towels or cotton towels

5. Shoe Trees

6. Protective Spray

First, take the suede brush to the dry pair of shoes. Remove as much dirt as possible. Go over the entire shoe, brushing the nap in one direction. In addition to brushing out dirt, this will also raise the nap.
Next, go over tough spots with a suede eraser. Rub over scuffs with the suede brush.
Remove water marks: take a damp (not soaking!) rag and wet down the entire shoe. Then gently sponge up any excess water. To dry, stuff the shoes with white paper towels or white cotton towels and place them in an area without direct sunlight or direct heat. It is important that you never apply direct heat to your shoes (place them near a radiator, toss them in the dryer, etc.) as this can damage your shoes.
Once shoes are dry, brush them again in one direction to restore the nap.
Apply a protective spray such as the Collonil Unisex Nanopro Spray 300ML.
Place in shoe tree like Alden Fine Cedar Shoe Trees so that excess moisture is absorbed.

Tech Tuesday : Learn more about the Clarks Wallabee

Clarks Originals are all about the Plantation crepe soles.  The shoe we are giving away this week, the Wallabee, is well-known due to its distinct look and comfort.  A large part of that image is due to the shoe’s plantation crepe soles.

W31_26035385_10199_6 W31_26035385_10199_15 W31_26078984_10145_6 W31_26078984_10145_21

Plantation crepe is a durable but lightweight, natural rubber.  It is intended to provide a softer foot strike and be more comfortable than a traditional sole because each step you take will be cushioned. Shoes with plantation crepe soles can also be much quieter than other shoes. The rubber’s crinkly texture that creates traction so that you don’t slip.

Crepe soles seem to be a love-it or hate-it feature for shoes.  The most common complaint is that the soft rubber picks up residue and “black gunk”.  Some people find that their Wallabee shoes look even better once worn-in.

However, some people don’t like the gunk. It can be controlled, though, if you care for your shoes.  The easiest way to prevent a lot of build-up is to routinely clean your shoes. You can find out how to do this on eHow, but the interesting step is to (after cleaning) take a rubber eraser, such as an art gum eraser, and gently rub it across the bottom of the shoe. Make sure to let them air-dry in a shady place to avoid discoloration or cracked leather.   Clarks also pairs with mail-order company Resole America, who will rebuild your plantation crepe soles and return your shoes in about a week.

Whether you like them worn or pristine, thanks to the plantation crepe sole, you know that you’ll be comfortable in your Clarks Wallabees.